Dyslexia is My Superpower

We’re delighted to have partnered up with our friends at Jessica Kingsley Publishers to run a fantastic competition to celebrate National Reading Month! Each week, we’ll feature a blog on three topical education books on our website (provided by Jessica Kingsley Publishers)

At the end of the month, we’ll be entering one lucky person the chance to win ALL of the books we feature. The winner will be announced on Day 2 of The Schools & Academies Show, ExCeL, London 3-4 April.

Tickets are free of charge – register for yours here


Margaret Rooke is a mother to a daughter with dyslexia. After her first book, Creative, Successful, Dyslexic: 23 High Achievers Share Their Stories, she decided to focus her work on children affected by this disorder and give them a voice through Dyslexia is My Superpower (Most of the Time). The book is made of more than 100 interviews with children and young adults, where they reveal personal tips and tactics for honing the creative benefits of dyslexia, enabling them to thrive in school and beyond.

With the advent of internet, parents and adult with dyslexia have been given a platform where to communicate and discuss about this disorder, but Rooke managed to put together the first book of its kind, where inspiring first-hand accounts normalise dyslexia and reveal the many success stories. Although dyslexia can still be a struggle, these interviewees also explain the great strengths dyslexia has given them: creativity, determination, empathy and grit.

This is an extract from the book, where Emma talks about tennis and how dyslexia helps her being a better player.

As soon as I’m on a tennis court and get in gear I have fun, I forget I’m dyslexic and I don’t have a care in the world. I want to be a famous tennis player when I’m older. A lot of people have dyslexia and some people who don’t have dyslexia can’t do the stuff you might be able to do. Playing tennis is what makes me feel better. I think being dyslexic helps me know where to be on the court, where to be before the ball bounces. Coaches have said I’m very good at listening and I pick things up quickly. The coach used to give notes but now he does videos rather than writing down the shot he wants me to do. I love that I get to play against my friends. I like that you don’t know what shots are going to happen and you might learn from one of the shots that they do.

Emma, 9, Renfrewshire, Scotland

Dyslexia is My Superpower(Most of the Time) is published by Jessica Kingsley Publishers and is available to purchase at: https://bit.ly/2tLB58R